Base de datos : IBECS
Búsqueda : "1886-3655" [ISSN]
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  1 / 540 IBECS  
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Texto completo SciELO España
Id: ET1-4333 IBECS-Express
Autor: Zimmerman, Kristin; Bluestein, Daniel.
Título: Pharmacists and Medicare's Annual Wellness Visit: implications for pharmacy education and interprofessional primary care
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);17(3):0-0, jul.-sept. 2019. tab.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/pharmpract.2019.3.1672.
Resumen: No disponible
Responsable: BNCS


  2 / 540 IBECS  
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Texto completo SciELO España
Id: ET1-4332 IBECS-Express
Autor: Hobbs, Andrea L; Crawford, Joshua P.
Título: Biosimilars and implications for pharmacy practice: Ready or not, here they come
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);17(3):0-0, jul.-sept. 2019. graf.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/pharmpract.2019.3.1659.
Resumen: No disponible
Responsable: BNCS


  3 / 540 IBECS  
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Texto completo SciELO España
Id: ET1-4331 IBECS-Express
Autor: Supapaan, Teeraporn; Low, Bee Y; Wongpoowarak, Payom; Moolasarn, Summana; Anderson, Claire.
Título: A transition from the BPharm to the PharmD degree in five selected countries
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);17(3):0-0, jul.-sept. 2019. tab.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/pharmpract.2019.3.1611.
Resumen: This review focuses on the studies and opinions around issues of transition from the BPharm to the PharmD degree in the U.S., Japan, South Korea, Pakistan and Thailand. The transition to the clinically orientated PharmD degree in many countries was seen to be a means of developing the profession. However, some countries have both clinically-oriented and pharmaceutical sciences-oriented PharmD programme that are designed to meet the needs of their countries. Each country created a different process to handle the transition to an all-PharmD programme, but mostly had the process of school accreditation mandated by the regulatory bodies. The main barrier to the transition in most of the countries was the issue of educational quality. A set of indicators is needed to measure and monitor the impact/outcome of the PharmD degree. Each country has different needs due to the different contexts of health care systems and the scope of pharmacy practice. In order to increase their chances of benefiting from the new programme, academic leaders should critically assess their countries' needs before deciding to adopt a PharmD programme

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  4 / 540 IBECS  
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Texto completo SciELO España
Id: ET1-4330 IBECS-Express
Autor: Hargraves, Daniel; White, Christopher C; Mauger, Marcia R; Puthota, Aruna; Pallerla, Harini; Wigle, Patricia; Brubaker, Sarah L; Schlaudecker, Jeffrey D.
Título: Evaluation of an interprofessional naloxone didactic and skills session with medical residents and physician assistant learners
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);17(3):0-0, jul.-sept. 2019. ilus, tab.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/pharmpract.2019.3.1591.
Resumen: Background: The CDC has reported 399,230 opioid-related deaths from 1999-2017. In 2018, the US surgeon general issued a public health advisory, advising all Americans to carry naloxone. Studies show that enhanced naloxone access directly reduces death from opioid overdose. Despite this, health care professional learners report low knowledge and confidence surrounding naloxone. Therefore, it becomes critical that medical education programs incorporate didactic and experiential sessions improving knowledge, skills and attitudes regarding harm reduction through naloxone. Objectives: 1. Describe the components and evaluation of a replicable and adaptable naloxone didactic and skills session model for medical providers; 2. Report the results of the evaluation from a pilot session with family medicine residents and physician assistant students; and 3. Share the session toolkit, including evaluation surveys and list of materials used. Methods: In July 2017, a literature search was completed for naloxone skill training examining best practices on instruction and evaluation. A training session for family medicine residents and physician assistant learners was designed and led by University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and College of Pharmacy faculty. The same faculty designed a pre and post session evaluation form through internal review on elements targeting naloxone knowledge, attitude, and self-efficacy. Results: The training session included one hour for a didactic and one hour for small group live skills demonstration in four methods of naloxone administration (syringe and ampule, nasal atomizer, branded nasal spray and auto injector). Forty-eight participants showed statistically significant (p<0.05) improvement in knowledge (67.5% to 95.9%), attitudes (71.2% to 91.2%), and self-efficacy (62.1% to 97.8%) from pre to post assessment. Forty-four of 48 participants agreed that the pace of the training was appropriate and that the information will be of use in their respective primary care practices. Supply costs for the session were USD 1,200, with the majority being reusable on subsequent trainings. Conclusions: Our study of a naloxone didactic and skills session for primary care trainees demonstrated significant improvements in knowledge, self-efficacy, and attitudes. It provides an adaptable and efficient model for delivery of knowledge and skills in naloxone administration training. The pilot data suggest that the training was efficacious

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  5 / 540 IBECS  
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Texto completo SciELO España
Id: ET1-4329 IBECS-Express
Autor: Langer, Bernhard; Kunow, Christian.
Título: Medication dispensing, additional therapeutic recommendations, and pricing practices for acute diarrhoea by community pharmacies in Germany: a simulated patient study
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);17(3):0-0, jul.-sept. 2019. tab.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/pharmpract.2019.3.1579.
Resumen: Background: In Germany over-the-counter medications (OTC) - which since 2004 are no longer subject to binding prices - can only be purchased in pharmacies. Pharmacy owners and their staff therefore have a special responsibility when dispensing, advising on and setting the prices of medications. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess medication dispensing, additional therapeutic recommendations and pricing practices for acute diarrhoea in adults and to evaluate the role of the patient's approach (symptom-based versus medication-based request) in determining the outcome of these aspects. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1 May to 31 July 2017 in all 21 community pharmacies in a medium-sized German city. Symptom-based and medication-based scenarios related to self-medication of acute diarrhoea were developed and used by five simulated patients (SPs) in all of the pharmacies (a total of 84 visits). Differentiating between the different test scenarios in terms of the commercial and active ingredient names and also the prices of the medications dispensed, the SPs recorded on collection forms whether the scenario involved generic products or original preparations as well as whether recommendations were made during the test purchases regarding an additional intake of fluids. Results: In each of the 84 test purchases one preparation was dispensed. However, a preparation for oral rehydration was not sold in a single test purchase. On the other hand, in 74/84 (88%) of test purchases, medications with the active ingredient loperamide were dispensed. In only 35/84 (42%) of test purchases, the patient was also recommended to ensure an 'adequate intake of fluids' in addition to being dispensed a medication. In symptom-based scenarios significantly more expensive medications were dispensed compared to the medication-based scenarios (Wilcoxon signed rank test: z = -4.784, p < 0.001, r = 0.738). Also within the different scenarios there were enormous price differences identified - for example, in the medication-based scenarios, even for comparable loperamide generics the cheapest preparation cost EUR 1.99 and the most expensive preparation cost EUR 4.53. Conclusions: Oral rehydration was not dispensed and only occasionally was an adequate intake of fluids recommended. There were also enormous price differences both between and within the scenarios investigated

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  6 / 540 IBECS  
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Id: ET1-4328 IBECS-Express
Autor: Hill, Brandon; Drew, Richard H; Wilson, Dustin.
Título: Impact of select risk factors on treatment outcome in adults with candidemia
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);17(3):0-0, jul.-sept. 2019. tab, graf.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/pharmpract.2019.3.1561.
Resumen: Background: Studies examining relationships between patient-related factors and treatment outcome in patients with candidemia are limited and often based on all-cause mortality. Objective: Our purpose was to examine the impact of concurrent renal replacement therapy (RRT) and other pre-specified factors on treatment outcome among adults with candidemia. Methods: This Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved, single-center, case-cohort study included patients over 18 years of age admitted to Duke University Hospital between Jun 1, 2013 and Jun 1, 2017 with a blood culture positive for Candida spp. Treatment-, patient-, and disease-specific data were collected, and outcome (success/failure) determined 90 days after the index culture. An odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) were calculated for the following during therapy: receipt of RRT, fluconazole monotherapy regimen, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and neutropenia. Results: Among the 112 encounters (from 110 unique patients) included, treatment failure occurred in 8/112 (7.1%). Demographics were comparable between outcome groups. Among 12 patients receiving concomitant RRT, only 1 patient failed therapy. With regard to treatment failure, no significant differences were observed with RRT (OR, 1.21; 95%CI, 0.14 - 10.75), fluconazole monotherapy regimen (OR, 1.59; 95%CI, 0.3-8.27), ICU stay (OR, 1.43; 95%CI, 0.32-6.29), and neutropenia (0 treatment failures). Conclusions: Treatment failure, receipt of concomitant RRT, and neutropenia were infrequent in patients undergoing treatment for candidemia. In our cohort, exposure to RRT, a fluconazole monotherapy regimen, ICU stay, or neutropenia during treatment did not impact treatment outcome

Resumen en ingles
Responsable: BNCS


  7 / 540 IBECS  
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Id: ET1-4327 IBECS-Express
Autor: Abbood, Sarah K; Assad, Hayder C; Al-Jumaili, Ali A.
Título: Pharmacist intervention to enhance postoperative fluid prescribing practice in an Iraqi hospital through implementation of NICE guideline
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);17(3):0-0, jul.-sept. 2019. tab, graf.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/pharmpract.2019.3.1552.
Resumen: Objective: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the current practice of postoperative fluid prescribing and assess the effectiveness of pharmacist-led intervention in the implementation of the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) fluid therapy guideline in an Iraqi hospital. Methods: The prospective interventional study was conducted at AL-Hilla Teaching Hospital, Babylon, Iraq between November 2017 and July 2018. The study included two phases: The pre-intervention phase with 84 patients and the post-intervention phase with 112 patients. A pharmacist provided training and educational sessions for the hospital physicians and pharmacists about the NICE guideline of fluid therapy. The researcher calculated the amount of given post-operative fluids and compared to the NICE guideline and also measured the patients' body weight, serum Na, K and creatinine pre-and post-operatively. Results: The pre-intervention phase showed no correlation between the amounts of prescribed fluids and body weight which caused increases in patients' body weight. In pre-intervention phase, 6% of patients experienced hyponatremia, 19% had hypernatremia and 7.1% had hypokalemia. In the post-intervention phase, abnormal level of electrolytes and patient weight gain decreased significantly. Additionally, the intervention led to a strong correlation between body weight and amount of prescribed fluids in addition to lowering the incidence of electrolyte disturbances. Conclusions: A high proportion of patients in the pre-intervention phase experienced fluid overload, weight gain and electrolyte disturbances when fluid therapy was not prescribed in accordance with the NICE guidelines. The pharmacist-led intervention increased the surgeon awareness of the proper use of the NICE guideline which decreased the incidence of fluid-related complications and the inconsistency of fluid prescribing. Pharmacists can play a critical role to enhance post-operative fluid prescribing and minimize fluid-induced complications

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  8 / 540 IBECS  
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Id: ET1-4326 IBECS-Express
Autor: Sacre, Hala; Tawil, Samah; Hallit, Souheil; Sili, Georges; Salameh, Pascale.
Título: Mandatory continuing education for pharmacists in a developing country: assessment of a three-year cycle
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);17(3):0-0, jul.-sept. 2019. tab, graf.
Idioma: es.
doi: 10.18549/pharmpract.2019.3.1545.
Resumen: Background: In Lebanon, mandatory continuing education (CE) for pharmacists was implemented in January 2014. Objective: The objectives of this study are to assess 1) the overall adherence to the mandatory CE program, 2) pharmacists' preferences related to CE, and 3) barriers to adherence to CE. Methods: By the end of October 2017, an evaluation of pharmacists' participation in the mandatory CE program was conducted using electronic reports available in the Learning Management System (LMS). Descriptive results were presented as frequencies and percentages. In addition, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among pharmacists to better understand their preferences and barriers to their participation to the CE program. Finally, a focus group was organized with pharmacists who did not start their CE. Results: Out of all registered pharmacists in Lebanon, 68.30% started their CE and 25.6% already achieved their required credits. Among pharmacists enrolled in the CE system, the majority (69%) used the online courses at least once. Moreover, CE enrolment was similar among old and young pharmacists except for those newly registered. The majority of pharmacists preferred clinical and pharmacological topics, followed by preventive medicine and transferable skills. Barriers to engaging in CE were mainly work and family obligations, lack of interest, lack of time, and difficulties in commuting and technology use. Conclusion: Although results of the present study are similar to those in developing countries, the resistance to change is higher. The Lebanese Pharmacists Association [Ordre des Pharmaciens du Liban] should develop strategies to motivate and enroll more pharmacists in the CE system, based on the barriers and preferences cited in the results, while continuing to offer high quality and cost-favorable CE programs to Lebanese pharmacists

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  9 / 540 IBECS  
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Id: ET1-4325 IBECS-Express
Autor: Chiampas, Thomas D; Biagi, Mark J; Badowski, Melissa E.
Título: Impact of an HIV-trained clinical pharmacist intervention on error rates of antiretroviral and opportunistic infection medications in the inpatient setting
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);17(3):0-0, jul.-sept. 2019. tab.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/pharmpract.2019.3.1543.
Resumen: Background: Based on a retrospective study performed at our institution, 38% of inpatients living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were found to have a medication error involving their anti-retroviral (ARV) and/or opportunistic infection (OI) prophylaxis medications. Objective: To determine the impact of a dedicated HIV-trained clinical pharmacist on the ARV and OI prophylaxis medication error rates at our institution. Methods: A prospective quality improvement project was conducted over a six month period to assess the impact of a dedicated HIV-trained clinical pharmacist on the ARV and OI prophylaxis medication error rates. IRB approval received. Results: There were 144 patients included in this analysis, who experienced a combined 76 medication errors. Compared to historical control study conducted at our institution, the percent of patients who experienced a medication error remained stable (38% vs. 39%, respectively) and the error rate per patient was similar (1.44 vs. 1.36, p=NS). The percent of medication errors that were corrected prior to discharge increased from 24% to 70% and the median time to error correction decreased from 42 hours to 11.5 hours (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Errors relating to ARV or OI prophylaxis medications remain frequent in inpatient people living with HIV/AIDS. After multiple interventions were implemented, ARV and OI prophylaxis medication errors were corrected faster and with greater frequency prior to discharge, however, similar rates of errors for patients existed. Dedicated HIV clinicians with adequate training and credentialing are necessary to manage this specialized disease state and to reduce the overall number of medication errors associated with HIV/AIDS

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  10 / 540 IBECS  
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Id: ET1-4324 IBECS-Express
Autor: Jakupi, Arianit; Raka, Denis; Kaae, Susanne; Sporrong, Sofia K.
Título: Culture of antibiotic use in Kosovo - an interview study with patients and health professionals
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);17(3):0-0, jul.-sept. 2019.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/pharmpract.2019.3.1540.
Resumen: Background: Kosovo is a new state and has a high consumption of antibiotics in relation to other European countries. Existing quantitative studies have shown that practices exist that is not optimal when it comes to antibiotic use in Kosovo, this includes citizens' use of antibiotics, pharmacy practices of selling antibiotics without prescriptions and physicians' prescribing behaviours. To address these problems, there is a need for a deeper understanding of why antibiotics are handled in a suboptimal way. Objective: The objective was to explore antibiotic users', community pharmacists' and prescribers' attitudes towards, experiences of, and knowledge about antibiotics in Kosovo. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients who recently received an antibiotic prescription for an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), patients who recently received antibiotics for a URTI without a prescription, community pharmacists, and physicians. Interviews were recorded, translated into English, and analysed using deductive content analysis. Results: In total, 16 interviews were conducted in the period from 2015-2016. Five themes were identified: Obtaining antibiotics, Choice of antibiotics, Patient information, Patients' knowledge and views on when to use antibiotics, and Professionals' knowledge and attitudes towards antimicrobial resistance. Antibiotics were sometimes obtained without a prescription, also by patients who currently had received one. The specific antibiotic could be chosen by a physician, a pharmacist or the patient him/herself. Former experience was one reason given by patients for their choice. Patients' knowledge on antibiotics was mixed, however health professionals were knowledgeable about e.g. antimicrobial resistance. Conclusions: There is currently a culture of antibiotic use in Kosovo, including attitudes and behaviours, and hence also experiences, which is possibly underlying the high consumption of antibiotics in the country. The culture is reproduced by patients, pharmacists and physicians. There is, however, an awareness of the current problematic situation among practitioners and policy makers; and as Kosovo is a new country, opportunities to effectively tackle antimicrobial resistance exist

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