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Texto completo SciELO España
Id: ET1-5670 IBECS-Express
Autor: Anderson, Claire; Sharma, Ravi.
Título: Primary health care policy and vision for community pharmacy and pharmacists in England
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);18(1):0-0, ene.-mar. 2020.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/PharmPract.2020.1.1870.
Resumen: The United Kingdom health and care system is changing dramatically to meet the health challenges of the 21st century. People will increasingly have multiple morbidities. The focus of service delivery is changing from hospital to community, patient to population and curative to preventive. This paper describes the NHS and primary care and community pharmacy in England at the start of 2020, a time of great change. The 10-year vison for the NHS is that everyone gets the best start in life, world class care for major health problems supporting people to age well. It has over 40 mentions of pharmacists and pharmacy. The key aims of the plan are to improve 'out-of-hospital' care, and finally dissolve the historic divide between primary and community health service in England. All of England is covered by integrated care systems and the newly formed primary care networks which will form the foundation of these new systems. Pharmacy is involved at multiple levels. There are 11,569 community pharmacies and most of their total income comes from the NHS (range 68-85%). Around 60% pharmacies are part of multiple chains, with the remaining 40% independents or small chains of less than six outlets. The new five-year community pharmacy contract provides an opportunity to develop community pharmacy and move towards service delivery away from dispensing volume. The new services are described under medicines optimisation, prevention and urgent care. The pharmacy quality scheme is also described. The new deal will help many community pharmacies to plan their future, particularly for those pharmacies who are ready and able to change and work closely with pharmacists and other health professionals in collaboration with Primary Care Networks. There will be specific challenges around: dispensing efficiencies, freeing up pharmacists' time, wider use of clinical skills of community pharmacists, community pharmacy viability and consolidations

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  2 / 617 IBECS  
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Texto completo SciELO España
Id: ET1-5669 IBECS-Express
Autor: Llayton, Chelsey K; Caldas, Lauren M.
Título: Strategies for inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA+) education throughout pharmacy school curricula
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);18(1):0-0, ene.-mar. 2020. tab.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/PharmPract.2020.1.1862.
Resumen: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, and others (LGBTQIA+) patients face stigma and barriers to health care, including a lack of health care professionals' knowledge and confidence in treating this patient population. Pharmacists are in prime position to decrease this health disparity. United States pharmacy schools have limited LGBTQIA+ content, continuing the concern of recent graduates without knowledge and confidence. This commentary discusses potential barriers to introducing LGBTQIA+ content into school of pharmacy curricula and presents five strategies currently in use by nursing, medical, and pharmacy schools. Schools of Pharmacy should consider proactive incorporation of this content to graduate practitioners able to provide quality care to LGBTQIA+ patients

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  3 / 617 IBECS  
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Id: ET1-5668 IBECS-Express
Autor: Zachariah, Seeba; Al-Tamimi, Maitha; Vippadapu, Prasanna; Shenouda, Wessa; Thomas, Dixon.
Título: Value of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis by enoxaparin with anti-factor Xa trough concentration monitoring in surgical care
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);18(1):0-0, ene.-mar. 2020.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/PharmPract.2020.1.1808.
Resumen: No disponible
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  4 / 617 IBECS  
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Texto completo SciELO España
Id: ET1-5667 IBECS-Express
Autor: Mohammed, Mustapha; Zainal, Hadzliana; Tangiisuran, Balamurugan; Harun, Sabariah N; Ghadzi, Siti M; Looi, Irene; Sidek, Norsima N; Yee, Keng L; Aziz, Zariah A.
Título: Impact of adherence to key performance indicators on mortality among patients managed for ischemic stroke
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);18(1):0-0, ene.-mar. 2020. tab, graf.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/PharmPract.2020.1.1760.
Resumen: BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide. The cases of acute ischemic stroke are on the increase in the Asia Pacific, particularly in Malaysia. Various health organizations have recommended guidelines for managing ischemic stroke, but adherence to key performance indicators (KPI) from the guidelines and impact on patient outcomes, particularly mortality, are rarely explored. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the impact of adherence to key performance indicators on mortality among patients managed for ischemic stroke. METHODS: We included all first-ever ischemic stroke patients enrolled in the multiethnic Malaysian National Neurology Registry (NNeuR) - a prospective cohort study and followed-up for six months. Patients' baseline clinical characteristics, risk factors, neurological findings, treatments, KPI and mortality outcome were evaluated. The KPI nonadherence (NAR) and relationship with mortality were evaluated. NAR>25% threshold was considered suboptimal. RESULTS: A total of 579 first-ever ischemic stroke patients were included in the final analysis. The overall mortality was recorded as 23 (4.0%) in six months, with a median (interquartile) age of 65 (20) years. Majority of the patients (dead or alive) had partial anterior circulation infarct, PACI (43.5%; 34.0%) and total anterior circulation infarct, TACI (26.1%; 8.8%). In addition, DVT prophylaxis (82.8%), anticoagulant for atrial fibrillation (AF) patients (48.8%) and rehabilitation (26.2%) were considered suboptimal. NAR < 2 was significantly associated with a decrease in mortality (odds ratio 0.16; 0.02-0.12) compared to NAR>2. Survival analysis showed that death is more likely in patients with NAR>2 (p = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: KPI nonadherence was associated with mortality among ischemic stroke patients. The adherence to the KPI was sub-optimal, particularly in DVT prophylaxis, anticoagulant for AF patients and rehabilitation. These findings reflect the importance of continuous quality measurement and implementation of evidence recommendations in healthcare delivery to achieve optimal outcome among stroke patients

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Id: ET1-5666 IBECS-Express
Autor: Park, Jamie Y; Min, Jason.
Título: Exploring Canadian pharmacy students' e-health literacy: a mixed method study
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);18(1):0-0, ene.-mar. 2020. tab.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/PharmPract.2020.1.1747.
Resumen: BACKGROUND: While much has been described about technology use by digital natives in general, understanding of pharmacy student's knowledge and understanding of technology is lacking. OBJECTIVE: This study explores the current state of pharmacy students' self-rated digital health literacy in British Columbia, Canada, and seeks to identify future opportunities for technology training in pharmacy education and in practice. METHODS: A mixed methods design using surveys and semi-structured interviews was conducted. An online, validated survey (eHEALS) was conducted among currently enrolled 2nd to 4th year pharmacy students at the University of British Columbia. An additional interview was offered to consenting participants to further explore the use of technology in daily lives, pharmacy practicums, and implications on future pharmacy curricula. Both quantitative and qualitative thematic analysis was done of all data. RESULTS: A total of 30 pharmacy students completed the eHEALS survey and 5 completed interviews. Most participants were 2nd year students (50%), were 25 years and younger (80%), and female (87%). Ranking of digital health literacy was lower than expected with participants stating they know what (87%), where (87%) and how to find (77%) health resources on the Internet. Even less students (77%) rated that they have the skills to evaluate the health resources that they find on the Internet and only 53% felt confident in using information from the Internet to make health decisions. Most students mentioned that they had limited technology related training at school and would like more training opportunities throughout their program and connect what they have learned at school to their practice. CONCLUSIONS: These results expose significant and surprising gaps in student understanding of technology despite modifications seen in the entry-to-practice PharmD curriculum. Regional differences and digital health literacy of practicing pharmacists are areas that require better understanding and hold significant impact as practice evolves

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  6 / 617 IBECS  
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Texto completo SciELO España
Id: ET1-5665 IBECS-Express
Autor: Badro, Danielle A; Sacre, Hala; Hallit, Souheil; Amhaz, Ali; Salameh, Pascale.
Título: Good pharmacy practice assessment among community pharmacies in Lebanon
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);18(1):0-0, ene.-mar. 2020. tab, graf.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/PharmPract.2020.1.1745.
Resumen: OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess good pharmacy practice (GPP) aspects and compare GPP scores among community pharmacies in Lebanon, using a tool developed jointly by the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) and the World Health Organization (WHO) to improve and maintain standards of pharmacy practice. METHODS: Data collection was carried out between July and October 2018 by a team of 10 licensed inspectors who work at the Lebanese Order of Pharmacists (OPL) and visited community pharmacies across Lebanon. The questionnaire was adapted to the Lebanese context and included 109 questions organized under five sections: socio-demographics, Indicator A (data management and data recording), Indicator B (services and health promotion), Indicator C (dispensing, preparation and administration of medicines), and Indicator D (storage and facilities). The value of 75% was considered as the cutoff point for adherence to indicators. RESULTS: Out of 276 pharmacies visited, a total of 250 (90.58%) pharmacists participated in the study with one pharmacist being interviewed in every pharmacy. Results showed that 18.8% of pharmacists were generally adherents to GPP guidelines (scores above the 75% cutoff): 23.3% were adherent to indicator A, 21.6% to indicator B, 14.8% to indicator C and 13.2% to indicator D. Moreover, comparison of GPP scores across geographical regions revealed a higher adherence among community pharmacists working in the Beirut region compared to the North region, the South region, Mount Lebanon, and the Bekaa. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that community pharmacists in Lebanon do not fulfill GPP criteria set by FIP/WHO, and that this poor adherence is a trend across the country's geographical regions. Therefore, efforts should be made to raise awareness among pharmacists about the necessity to adhere to GPP guidelines and standards, and train them and support them appropriately to reach that goal. This is the first indicator-based comprehensive pilot assessment to evaluate GPP adherence in community pharmacies across Lebanon. Working on the optimization of this assessment tool is also warranted

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Id: ET1-5664 IBECS-Express
Autor: Alawneh, Majdoleen AL; Nuaimi, Nabeel; Abu-Gharbieh, Eman; Basheti, Iman A.
Título: A randomized control trial assessing the effect of a pharmaceutical care service on Syrian refugees' quality of life and anxiety
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);18(1):0-0, ene.-mar. 2020. tab, graf.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/PharmPract.2020.1.1744.
Resumen: BACKGROUND: Syrian refugees residing in Jordan suffer from chronic illnesses, low quality of life (QoL) and anxiety. Pharmacists delivering the medication review service can have a role in improving this growing worldwide problem. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of the medication review service on QoL and anxiety scores for Syrian refugees living with chronic medical conditions. METHODS: This randomized single-blinded intervention control study was conducted in Jordan. Syrian refugees were recruited and randomized into intervention and control groups. Two home visits were organized with each participant, at baseline and three months later. The medication review service was delivered to the participants and questionnaires regarding QoL and anxiety were completed by all participants. As a part of the medication review service, drug-related problems (DRPs) were identified by a clinical pharmacist for all patients, but recommendations to resolve these DRPs were delivered to intervention group refugees' physicians only (control group patients did not receive this part of the service till the end of the study); DRPs were corrected and pharmacist-delivered counseling and education were provided as well. At follow-up, DRPs assessment, QoL and anxiety scores were assessed for refugees in the intervention and control groups. RESULTS: Syrian refugees (n=106) were recruited and randomized into intervention (n=53) and control (n=53) groups with no significant difference between both groups at baseline. The number of medications and diagnosed chronic diseases per participant was 5.8 (SD 2.1) and 2.97 (SD 1.16), respectively. At follow-up, a significant decrease in the number of DRPs for refugees in the intervention group was found (from 600 to 182, p < 0.001), but not for the control group (number stayed at 541 DRPs, p = 0.116). Although no significant difference between the groups was found with regards to QoL at follow-up (p = 0.266), a significant difference was found in the anxiety scores between the groups (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The medication review service delivered by clinical pharmacists can significantly improve refugees' DRPs and anxiety scores. As for QoL, significant improvements can be seen for all refugee patients, regardless of whether the DRPs identified were resolved or not

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Id: ET1-5663 IBECS-Express
Autor: Foppa, Aline A; Martins, Gabriella A; Nascimento, Ronald F; Mesquita, Alessandra R; Mendonça, Simone A; Chemello, Clarice.
Título: Experiential education in the pharmacy undergraduate curricula in Brazil
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);18(1):0-0, ene.-mar. 2020. tab, graf.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/PharmPract.2020.1.1738.
Resumen: OBJECTIVE: Considering the curriculum reform process taking place in pharmacy undergraduate programs in Brazil and the importance of practical experience to students throughout their learning process in university, this study aims to provide an overview of pharmacy undergraduate programs in Brazil and their respective internships. METHODS: An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study. A documentary analysis of pharmacy undergraduate programs in the face-to-face modality was carried out, with data obtained from the Political Pedagogical Projects of the programs, the curricula, and course descriptions containing information on internships, all provided by the Brazilian Ministry of Education. The data collected concerned higher education institutions (HEIs), pharmacy programs and internships. RESULTS: Pharmacy undergraduate programs in Brazil have a median duration of 10 semesters, requiring from students a median of 6 internships, from the 6thsemester on, totalizing 826 hours. The programs lack uniformity among their internships, mainly regarding total hours and the semester in which internships start. The pharmacy internships cover, in greater number, the areas of outpatient and community pharmacy, clinical analysis, and pharmaceutical technology, respectively, being clinical analysis the area with more hours. Public and private HEIs have different internship proceedings in their curricula, hence no homogeneity among them in the different regions of Brazil. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the diversity of pharmacy programs in Brazil in the context of internships, reflecting on the training and the activity of pharmacists in recent decades. Further studies are needed to deepen the understanding of this theme

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Id: ET1-5662 IBECS-Express
Autor: Alsairafi, Zahra; Mason, Julie; Davies, Natasha; Dennis, Molly; Pilgrim, Gabrielle; Goel, Neera; Yahyouche, Asma; Jalal, Zahraa.
Título: Community pharmacy advanced adherence services for children and young people with long-term conditions: a cross-sectional survey study
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);18(1):0-0, ene.-mar. 2020. tab, graf.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/PharmPract.2020.1.1720.
Resumen: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the provision of community pharmacy services to children and young people with a focus on advanced services such as medicines use review. Perceptions and experiences of community pharmacists, pharmacy staff, young people and their parents or carers on the provision of such services were also explored. METHODS: Four different cross-sectional, self-administered questionnaires were distributed in parallel to pharmacists, pharmacy staff members, children and young people and parents in the United Kingdom. RESULTS: An outline of pharmacist's current involvement with children and young people was provided by 92 pharmacists. A different group of 38 community pharmacists and 40 non-pharmacist members of pharmacy staff from a total of 46 pharmacies provided information and views on the conduct of Medicines use review with children and young people. Experiences of advanced pharmacy service provision were collected from 51 children and young people and 18 parents. Most pharmacists offered public health advice to children and young people (73/92; 79.3%) and even more (83/92; 90.2%) reported that they often interacted with children and young people with long-term condition. Despite their high levels of interaction, and a majority opinion that medicines use reviews could benefit children (35/38; 92.1%), the number of pharmacies reporting to have conducted medicines use reviews with children was low (5/41). Pharmacists perceived the main barriers to recruitment as consent (17/29; 58.6%), guideline ambiguity (14/29; 48.3%) and training (13/29; 44.8%). A considerable proportion pharmacists (12/29; 41.4%) and other personnel (14/33; 42.4%) working in community pharmacies were unaware that children were potentially eligible for medicines use reviews. Only 29.4% of the 51 children and young people participants had received advice about their long-term condition from a pharmacist and the majority (46/51; 90.2%) had not taken part in an advanced service focused on adherence. CONCLUSIONS: While general engagement with children and young people appears high from the pharmacist's perspective, advice specific to children and young people with long-term conditions and the provision of advanced services in this group remains a challenge

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Id: ET1-5661 IBECS-Express
Autor: Abu Farha, Rana K; Rashad, Mays; Hasen, Eliza; Mukattash, Tareq L; Al-Hashar, Amna; Basheti, Iman A.
Título: Evaluation of the effect of video tutorial training on improving pharmacy students' knowledge and skills about medication reconciliation
Fuente: Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet);18(1):0-0, ene.-mar. 2020. tab, graf.
Idioma: en.
doi: 10.18549/PharmPract.2020.1.1711.
Resumen: OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to describe the effect of using an innovative teaching strategy using a video tutorial on enhancing students' knowledge about medication reconciliation, and skills in identifying medication discrepancies. METHODS: This is a one group pre-post interventional study that was conducted at the School of Pharmacy at Applied Science Private University. Sixty pharmacy students were invited to attend an educational sessions that involve watching a 6-minutes video tutorial. The first two levels of the Kirkpatrick's Model were used to evaluate the effectiveness of this training tool. Level 1 (Reaction) was assessed using a satisfaction questionnaire, while level 2 (Learning) was assessed using two criteria: 1) student acquired knowledge about medication reconciliation using a questionnaire and a knowledge score out of 13 was calculated for each student, and 2) student acquired skills in identifying medication discrepancies using a virtual case scenario. If the student was able to identify any of the four impeded discrepancies he/she rewarded 1 point for each identified discrepancy, but if they identified any incorrect discrepancy they scored a negative point. RESULTS: Among the 60 students who registered to participate in the study, 49 attended the educational training (response rate 81.6%). The majority of them (n=44, 89.8%) were satisfied with the training process. Before the video tutorial, students showed an overall low knowledge score [4.08/13.0, SD 1.81], and low ability to identify discrepancies [0.72 identified discrepancies out of 4.0, SD 1.1]. Following the video tutorial, the overall knowledge score was improved (p < 0.001), and students were able to identify more discrepancies after watching the video (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: In conclusion, video education has shown itself to be an effective method to educate pharmacy students. . This visualized method can be applied to other areas within pharmacy education. We encourage the integration of videos within the learning process to enhance students' learning experience and to support the traditional learning provided by the teaching staff

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